Posts tagged build

Feast your eyes on the Harley Davidson scrambler build by Burly Brand- can’t help but be a fan of the chunky dual sport tires, top rack, low profile seat and dirt bike bars. Oh, the ideas I’m getting… 
Now, yes, a Sportster isn’t a light motorcycle, and I wouldn’t say generally makes the best base line for a scrambler bike. If you want to really be able to go braapin’ off road, you’ll need something that won’t snap your leg in half if you awkwardly drop it in some loose dirt/sand/mud. That being said, I’m also a huge fan of using machinery in brilliant ways that perhaps it was not originally intended for. Such as MotoCorsa’s TerraCorsa- a Ducati 1199 Panigale outfitted with knobbies and panniers. That being said, I bet this Harley Scrambler bike would be really fun to ride (and so would the TerraCorsa). 
[ More photos in the BikeEXIF feature ]

Feast your eyes on the Harley Davidson scrambler build by Burly Brand- can’t help but be a fan of the chunky dual sport tires, top rack, low profile seat and dirt bike bars. Oh, the ideas I’m getting… 

Now, yes, a Sportster isn’t a light motorcycle, and I wouldn’t say generally makes the best base line for a scrambler bike. If you want to really be able to go braapin’ off road, you’ll need something that won’t snap your leg in half if you awkwardly drop it in some loose dirt/sand/mud. That being said, I’m also a huge fan of using machinery in brilliant ways that perhaps it was not originally intended for. Such as MotoCorsa’s TerraCorsa- a Ducati 1199 Panigale outfitted with knobbies and panniers. That being said, I bet this Harley Scrambler bike would be really fun to ride (and so would the TerraCorsa)

[ More photos in the BikeEXIF feature ]

Mitch Sander’s 1966 Triumph Bonneville

A while back (seriously, a while ago) I met Mitch Sander up in Yakima, WA (he now lives in Seattle) through our mutual friend Dave Buchanan (redandblackattack.tumblr.com) and laid eyes on his beautiful Triumph. It’s a garage built 1966 Bonneville hard tail with a modern front end. 

We all sat down and ate burritos and talked about bikes, I picked his brain about his build because dammit… I would so love to ride that thing. It’s classy, functional, sounds awesome, and has history. Read on for my interview with Mitch.

Christmas take two! A box (complete with custom artwork!) arrived from DP Customs today. Box exhaust for the Sportster Build! After seeing this in person at Chopperfest on the Burly Brand bike… I was sold.  

Monster Project: Phase 20

So, last we left off… the Monster Project was mostly put back together, and at Heath’s shop for ease of some last major-ish tasks. 

The main thing left was refinishing the scraped up engine covers. 

Monster Project: Phase 19

The last part of the Monster building process that I wrote an ‘official’ article about was when I finished the rolling chassis at SDS and moved it to my living room for awhile

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1969 Triumph/BSA Chopper: Electric Alice

When Daniel said “I’m going to ride this thing out of here tonight or tomorrow” I couldn’t help but feel pessimistic due to my own failures during my Monster build. 

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When I saw Quentin Wilson post a photo of the project he was working on I almost choked on my coffee- a Ducati 1199 Panigale set up for adventure riding. Q is just crazy enough to do this kind of thing, get muddy, have fun, and smile for days after… so I was more than excited to see the outcome. 

Well, a couple weeks later here’s a great shot from Arun Sharma of the knobby-sporting TerraCorsa all muddy and used. See more photos on MotoCorsa.com of this genius madness.

Rust Bucket Project: The Bondo Bike

At the Deviants CC compound in Vancouver, WA… I spent a few hours going at the BSA frame with an angle grinder yesterday. My mission was to remove the bondo from the frame so I could see what is really going on with the structure of the hard tail, where I need to cut and start over again. 

The welds look pretty old judging by the wear and tear, and Wolf told me they were probably stick welds not something more fine tuned. Whoever built this bike must have fancied themselves a sculpter because they chose to use the bondo crap to shape it instead of metal. Seems silly to me. 

Monster Project: Phase 18

So, last I left off in Monster Project blog updates… I couldn’t find all the important bits for the rear wheel and attaching it to the bike. Axle, spacers, etc. I ripped apart my garage and stayed up until 5a putting it back together and just couldn’t find them. 

I called everyone who’s shop the bike had been at to double check I hadn’t left it somewhere, and finally caved and replaced the rear axle and spacer bits. I stopped by Cheshire Motorsports on Division in Portland and they had the parts I needed… used! Cost me $40 and I was back in business.

Monster Project: Phase 17

Trying to get blog updates for the Monster Project all caught up, been a busy bee. If you recall, the bike was transported in pieces to SDS via my Honda coupe.

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Those who payed attention to instagram saw it being put back together by myself and the veteran racer Nobi Iso.

Sofi Tsingos (parts lady at Ducati Dallas) and her 1977 Honda CB550 cafe racer build.
Words on the process from Sofi-

My dad and I started to really get into Cafe bikes back in 09’. Found a new way to express another kind of art, kinda like hot rods. We looove old cars and hot rods. My Dad started reading up on the old Tritons, he found a frame and started piecing one together. I kept saying I wanted to build one too and started doing my own research. I was thinking about an old Ducati bevel but those where hard to find cheap. I was having a really hard time in life at the time so my Dad got me the CB550 for christmas to give me something else to focus on. Became obsessed with ready other peoples creations on different forums and the cafe racer magazines. Pulling all my favorite parts of each bike and created my own vision I guess… About a 3rd of the way through, my Dad and I moved back to texas where I got a full time job as a tech with Ducati Dallas so that took most of my time. Also had aother project I started and had to finish. The bike continues to bomb around town with me a couple times a week. I absolutely love it and will never sell it.

[ More photos of Honda CB’s | of Sofi Tsingos ]

Sofi Tsingos (parts lady at Ducati Dallas) and her 1977 Honda CB550 cafe racer build.

Words on the process from Sofi-

My dad and I started to really get into Cafe bikes back in 09’. Found a new way to express another kind of art, kinda like hot rods. We looove old cars and hot rods. My Dad started reading up on the old Tritons, he found a frame and started piecing one together. I kept saying I wanted to build one too and started doing my own research. I was thinking about an old Ducati bevel but those where hard to find cheap. I was having a really hard time in life at the time so my Dad got me the CB550 for christmas to give me something else to focus on. Became obsessed with ready other peoples creations on different forums and the cafe racer magazines. Pulling all my favorite parts of each bike and created my own vision I guess… About a 3rd of the way through, my Dad and I moved back to texas where I got a full time job as a tech with Ducati Dallas so that took most of my time. Also had aother project I started and had to finish. The bike continues to bomb around town with me a couple times a week. I absolutely love it and will never sell it.

[ More photos of Honda CB’s | of Sofi Tsingos ]

Hannah Johnson and her very nearly finished custom Hypermotard 1100S. That frame is not just neon pink, but glittery. Hannah is 5’3” and that Hyper has a 33.3” (84.58 cm) seat height. Hannah is also the worlds only female Ducati Master Tech.

Not much tangible progress on the Monster Project as of late. Lots of planning and decisions, and small bumps in the road to completion (as usual). I spent a few hours yesterday working on my mock ups, emailing people and getting timelines taken care of. It’s looking like September (I know, I know). But in the mean time, I can stare at my drawings and drool. (And then fall victim to my slight OCD and erase and re-draw everything ten more times.)

Not much tangible progress on the Monster Project as of late. Lots of planning and decisions, and small bumps in the road to completion (as usual). I spent a few hours yesterday working on my mock ups, emailing people and getting timelines taken care of. It’s looking like September (I know, I know). But in the mean time, I can stare at my drawings and drool. (And then fall victim to my slight OCD and erase and re-draw everything ten more times.)

You might be thinking, “wtf am I looking at?” Well my friends, you’re looking at a motorcycle constructed by a Frenchman from a broken Citroën 2CV automobile. Emile Laray was stranded in the Moroccan desert with only ten days worth of rations… did he shrivel up and die? No. He built himself a damn motorcycle in true badass apocalypse fashion. Now that is custom!
Read the full story and see more photos on Jalopnik »
(And thanks to Tyler for the tip!)

You might be thinking, “wtf am I looking at?” Well my friends, you’re looking at a motorcycle constructed by a Frenchman from a broken Citroën 2CV automobile. Emile Laray was stranded in the Moroccan desert with only ten days worth of rations… did he shrivel up and die? No. He built himself a damn motorcycle in true badass apocalypse fashion. Now that is custom!

Read the full story and see more photos on Jalopnik »

(And thanks to Tyler for the tip!)

Recognize the bike mid-wheelie in the lower right corner? It was shown at the One Motorcycle Show. 

Recognize the bike mid-wheelie in the lower right corner? It was shown at the One Motorcycle Show